The well-intentioned codswallop of the truly banjoed

Comics-related toot by Tom Murphy

FullPageBleed.blogspot.co.uk/

Twitter: @TomMurphyBF

 

whitecomics:

Hi! I’m going to be exhibiting at RIPE in Providence this coming weekend. Up top is My Name is Martin Shears, a show debut — it’s 24 b&w pages with hand-colored covers. It will be available online after the show.

Also pictured are all the other books I’ll have available, including an anthology curated by Warren Craghead which features what might be my favorite comic I’ve made this year. I’ll also have display copies of Comics Workbook Magazine #1-4 for your perusal.

Finally, I’ll be moderating two panels: one on poetry comics and one on webcomics. More info here. Times have yet to be announced, but I’ll update this post when they are.

See you there, maybe? Please stop by and say hello!

Onna-Bugeisha - Frank Candiloro brings his emphatic narrative style to the world of the samurai

prynnette:

Eva Mirabal wasn’t just the first female Native American cartoonist—she was one of the first Native American cartoonists period, and one of the first female creators to have her own strip. Born Eah-Ha-Wa (“Fast Growing Corn” in the Tiwa language), Mirabal grew up surrounded by art: her father served as an artists’ model, she spent years studying art at the Santa Fe Indian school under director Dorothy Dunn, who recognized her “ability to translate everyday events into scenes of warmth and seminaturalistic beauty” right off the bat, and at nineteen was featured as part of a gallery exhibition in Chicago. World War II brought her work to a wider audience when, after enlisting in the Woman’s Army Corps in 1943, she was commissioned to create a strip for the Corps newsletter. G.I. Gertie gave canny, irreverent voice to women in the military, and Mirabal was quickly commissioned for more work, most notably her posters advertising war bonds. After the war, she served as an Artist-in-Residence at Southern Illinois University, painted murals for schools, planetariums, and military facilities, and eventually returned to the Taos Pueblo. Her later works, signed not as Eva Mirabal but as Eah-Ha-Wah, depict everyday Pueblo life with uncommon passion and candor.

Today, Eva Mirabal is far from celebrated. You’re really only going to find the same G.I.Gertie strip over and over again if you search online, many of her murals have been demolished, and her tumblr tag is empty. But her work—intimate, warm, and keenly felt—stands strong, decades after her death. The comics and art world stand in sore need of women like Mirabal: G.I. Gertie was not the work of a male cartoonist, cracking jokes about those silly women and their silly woman concerns, nor are her paintings the product of a white observer, smearing his bias across a community he “discovered.” Mirabal was a woman writing for women, a member of the Taos Pueblo creating for the Taos Pueblo—an artist committed to her world and its validity.

(Third in a series on women in the comics industry.) 

puketrick:

puketrick:

I’ve been working hard to finish New Comics 4 before the slew of events this fall. I can say safely that it will be printed and ready early next month. The Issue is 7 x 10”, 48 pages and contains material that I’ve been posting on tumblr lately, plus more. 

Pre-orders are very much appreciated. 

Get it here.

Thanks to those that have already ordered! I am hoping to fund this print run entirely with pre-orders, so if you are so inclined please help me out by buying in advance! 

blastro:

New story!

A Year In Which Nothing Much Happened 

This was originally a b&w single-sheet book on butcher paper. I always thought it needed some color. You can also read it at my website and if you like it, consider checking out my recent book.

Hope you like it!

birdcagebottombooks:

THIS IS THE LAST POST ON TUMBLR WE WILL MAKE ABOUT THE CRINGE COMICS ANTHOLOGY ON KICKSTARTER (because today is the last day of the campaign)!

I know it’s weird to post a table of contents page, but look at that line up of talented artists! 

Also, you can get a shirt with that Noah Van Sciver drawing up there, but only by ordering via Kickstarter TODAY

CAPS LOCK MEANS WE’RE SHOUTING AT YOU!!!

drawnandquarterly:

Look what arrived in the office today! Gilbert Hernandez’s Bumperhead will be debuting at San Diego Comic-Con!

comicsalliance:

ANDY HIRSCH’S ‘STATION 38′ IS THE BEST 3D COMIC OF ALL TIME

By Chris Sims

Last year, one of the comics I was most excited about picking up from HeroesCon was a “Flashlight Comic” by Andy Hirsch. The untitled story was a creepy little masterpiece of using the form, with black linework printed on clear plastic and superimposed over dark paper, with a flashlight-shaped piece of paper that you could slip between to “illuminate” a small circle of the page, exploring a strange and ruined house along with a stranded motorist. It was fantastic, full of tricks and surprises that made the reader an active participant in the story and conveyed a sense of fear better than almost anything I’ve ever read, and over the last year, I’ve wondered how Hirsch was going to top it, or if he was even going to bother.

Turns out that he did, and once again he’s using paper comics to do things that you can only do with physical objects. The story he’s telling this year is called Station 38, a journey through a deadly space station sold as a cube that you unfold as you read to form the floor plan that you’re exploring along with the characters. And it’s amazing.

READ MORE

iwasdoingtheliveshow:

A set of Sapphire and Steel pages by Arthur Ranson, pinched from here.

These would have originally appeared in Look-In, a sort of strange amalgam of TV listings and comics about ITV shows for children.  The comic ran from the 70s to the 90s, and none of the work in it has ever been collected, as far as I’m aware.

fantagraphics:

thebristolboard:

Portrait of the artist as a young genius. These pages and the excellent cover are from Robert Crumb’s sketchbook in the summer of 1961 when he was just 18 years old!

Crumb